Some people tap their feet . . .

           Some people snap their fingers . . .

                    Some people just sway back and forth . . .

 I JUST SORTA DO 'EM ALL TOGETHER, I GUESS.

On the brink of becoming an artistic phenomenon: Elvis Presley

On July 5, 1954, Elvis Presley, chock full of nerves and not exactly sure of what would transpire, ventured inside Sun Studio for his first official recording session with producer Sam Phillips, guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black.

After trying various songs with middling results, Phillips was ready to end the session, but Presley serendipitously began playing Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup’s “That’s All Right” on his acoustic guitar, fusing the bluesy number into a heretofore unexplored musical genre that ultimately became rock ’n’ roll.

Subscribe to our widely acclaimed magazine

─ 4 issues €60 ─ delivered to your doorstep. 

YES, world-wide!

October release:

 

Due to the high demand of the first 5 TTWII volumes, we are proud to announce the following . . .

TTWII soft-cover-color-photo-coffee-table book. SOON available in our shop for €62,- only. Incl. world-wide shipping

TTWII softcover photo folio

The ManThe Myth - The Legend

That's what www.theelvisfiles.com Is All About - Elvis Presley

The Mirror: Saturday 14 july, 1956.

Elvis with the rotating Pelvis

TEENAGERS IN RAPTURES, ADULTS IRATE.

By Larry Foley

NEW YORK, Today: The biggest noise in American show business today, a singer called Elvis 'The Pelvis' Presley, has teenagers stomping in ecstasy and adults hopping mad. Elvis rotates his pelvis as he sings. 'If he did that on the street,' said a Californian cop, eyeing a typical Presley performance, 'we'd arrest him.' Until last month adult America was inclined to shrug off Presley as just the latest teenage craze, successor to Frank Sinatra and Johnny Ray. But then a national television network featured him in the Milton Berle Show — and everybody concerned in the act has been learning ever since from outraged parents, critics, clergymen, and educators that Presley doesn't exactly add up to clean, wholesome family entertainment.

Daily News. Tuesday, June 5, 1956.
Performing "Hound Dog" on June 5, 1956 at The Milton Berle Show. Burbank Studios, Hollywood, Ca.

Veteran New York Daily News critic Ben Gross said Presley gave an exhibition that was suggestive and vulgar, tinged with the kind of animalism that should be confined to dives and bordellos . . . this fellow is supposed to be a singer. But if his howling and yowling, wailing, screeching and caterwauling be a form of song, then a tomcat on a back fence deserves the title of 'world's greatest vocalist.' 'This new phenomenon, as he sings, indulges in bumps and grinds and other motions that would bring a blush to the cheeks of a hardened burlesque theatre usher. He wiggles itches and scratches, spins and gyrates as if he were doing a loathsome take-off on a victim of St. Vitus' dance. 'And all the while his face is distorted in suggestive smirks and leers. The picture — wittingly or unwittingly — appeals to the lowest instincts of the viewer — animalism at its rawest . . . No wonder there have been so many reports of teenage riots and other outbursts in towns and cities where Elvis has made personal appearances.'

Erik Lorentzen & KJ Consulting proudly presents the ULTIMATE Elvis Files magazines and books.

 

your on-line search ends here!

NEWdue for August "That's The Way It Was"  Vol.4 and 5

We've had Vol.1-2-3 a few months ago and now we have the complete collection with two more editions and +hundreds of unseen photos ─ in B/W and color ─  from the original negatives (not from the movie slides but from the MGM photographers). In all volumes you see over thousands of unseen photos you'll probably never see again, not in any book ─ NEVER.

 

And that's a promise!

 

Yes, I was in an Elvis Movie!

by ANN MOSES NOVEMBER 23, 2012

The first question whenever I tell someone I was in an Elvis movie is “which one?” And my answer is usually “Not one of his ‘corny’ movies like ‘Girls, Girls, Girls’ or ‘Speedway.’”

I was never a bikini-clad teenager dancing the Watusi to a lame Elvis musical number. I was not an extra in the stands as he sped around the racetrack as a race car driver. I was in the movie that most people say, “I’ve never heard of it.”

I was in Elvis: That’s the Way It Is, a documentary movie directed by Denis Sanders about Elvis Presley that was released on November 11, 1970. The film documents Elvis’ Summer Festival in Las Vegas during August 1970. It was his first non-dramatic film since the beginning of his movie career in 1956, and the film gives a clear view of Elvis’ return to live performances after years of making movies.

Although the majority of the footage takes place onstage at the International Hotel in Las Vegas, there are several other parts to the film: The opening credits sequence contains footage of Elvis’ show at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix on September 9, 1970. This was the first show of Elvis’ first tour in 13 years.

                                                                                                           

                                                                                                           

                   Elvis and his band are seen rehearsing for the Las Vegas engagement at MGM Studios in Culver City, California.

 

Later rehearsals show Elvis in Las Vegas with his back-up vocalists The Sweet Inspirations, Millie Kirkham and The Imperials Quartet. Footage of an Elvis Appreciation Society convention in Luxembourg was shot on September 5, 1970. Radio Luxembourg DJs Tony Prince and Peter Aldersley are on hand to lead the festivities. A tandem bicycle owned by Elvis was raffled off to a lucky fan in the audience. Additionally, various musicians are seen performing their own versions of Elvis’ songs.

What’s not mentioned is that the movie had interviews with an assortment of “fans,” interviewed and seen throughout this movie in small segments? I had been writing about Elvis for a couple of years. He was not too popular with the readers of Tiger Beat, but since Elvis never, ever appeared in Europe or the UK, he had an enormous fan following there. I was the Hollywood Correspondent to the New Musical Express pop music newspaper published in the UK, any and all information about Elvis was devoured by the readers.

I was often hounded by the Public Relations director of RCA records, Greylon Landon, to publicize Elvis’ latest movie (and the corresponding soundtrack album on RCA) and I would do this as a favor to him, because I could sell my Elvis stories to the NME. I also had two friends from high school, Tony and Don, who were complete Elvis “nuts.” That’s a fan to the 100th degree. So Greylon would send me premier tickets to new Elvis movies and I would pass them along to Tony and Don.

But in the summer of 1968, Greylon called and told me he had something really special. It was not to be publicized in advance, but he brought two tickets over to my office for the “Elvis starring Elvis Presley” TV show taping. He let me know this was a small group of people invited to view the taping of this TV special. This time I was not giving the tickets away. I did invite my friend Tony, as Don was out of state on vacation with his parents. It would have been a difficult choice if they both had been in California on that night.

Long story short, I not only enjoyed the TV show taping, but became an instant Elvis “nut” after seeing the new and improved Elvis. He was lean, dressed in black leather and to hear his voice live and up close, I was just overcome with his musical prowess.

Being witness to what would become known as the Elvis Comeback Special; I wrote many articles for Tiger Beat and the NME. When it came time for Denis Sanders to make his documentary film of Elvis he wanted to include fans in the story. As he told me in a personal interview when I asked him why he wanted to include fans in the documentary, he replied, “Because I feel you don’t have an entertainer without an audience. I feel that they are completely inter-related. Some sense of his effect on his audience is as much a part of the drama as the entertainer himself.

Then I asked if he had any idea when he began that the fans would be like the ones he put on film. He was candid, "No, I didn’t know anything about Presley fans." "I started with two girls and they put me in touch with other girls who had been in fans clubs and then the whole thing snowballed. I didn’t have too much time, I had to function as a detective, follow the leads. I also wanted to get a cross section. I didn’t want to have just girls who were 18 years old. I also wanted everything from teenyboppers to old ladies, men, different nationalities and had to find them. I found you that way. I got in touch with you from a fan that said: ‘Go see Ann Moses, she’s a fan.’"

When Denis first contacted me I was thrilled when he said he wanted to interview me for the film, but it was so much more than that! He said I would be a guest of MGM for Elvis’ show where they would be filming! An offer I couldn’t refuse. What few realize, though, is while I was so involved and so comfortable in the world of celebrities and Hollywood, I would get nauseous whenever I would have to speak on camera or make a live appearance. I always preferred being on the back side of the camera!

That said, I made my way to Vegas in August of 1970, I was more than excited. But it got better and better. As I gave my name to the Maitre d' of the International Showroom, he led me and my party of four down to the table that was one table to the right of center stage and we had the front four seats. Of course, I was not shy about sitting in the first seat closest to the stage.

It was a complete joy to see Elvis live again (as I had been present at his first live appearance in 10 years on July 31, 1969 for his opening show at the International), but I was well aware that the hand-held cameras were recording Elvis and the “fans” that would be a part of the documentary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was later in the month that Denis came to my Tiger Beat office and interviewed me with cameras rolling for my “interview” portion that appears in the film. I sat at my office desk and answered his questions nervously, and then they shot cover footage of me walking down the hall and talking with my Art Editor. It’s difficult to find the original VHS version of the movie, as it was re-cut in 2001 and I and the other fans ended on the cutting room floor of the new version and more performance footage was added.

What did end up in the original version of the movie was the interview in my office, and me watching Elvis from my stage side seat. Denis asked me about my job and I told him about my responsibilities as Editor of Tiger Beat. He asked, “What is an Elvis fan?”

My answer: “It’s so hard to describe what an Elvis fan is. It’s like a phenomenon like falling in love. You can’t describe how it happens, it’s just you’re in love and you know it, and it’s the same with being an Elvis fan.” My final quote in the movie is about seeing all of Elvis’ opening shows and I tell him, “I always go to every opening. I cover them for the New Musical Express in England, but even if I didn’t write for the paper, I know I’d be there. I just couldn’t miss it.”

These vignettes are spread throughout the movie and there are some great moments with the other fans: There’s nerd guy who calls Elvis “The Willie Mayes of entertainment,” and tells Denis “If I don’t like your film I’m going to write you a dirty little letter.”

Then there’s the church lady who tells us that being an Elvis fan is “more than just following his music, real Elvis fans devote part of their lives to him.” I love the 50ish grey haired woman and her 80ish white haired mother. Mother says she likes Elvis, “because he’s a religious boy and he respects his parents.” And the daughter tells us, “He puts so much into a show. Mother likes lots of action. She doesn’t like it when they shoot him from the waist up. She likes to see him move and I admit I do too. He sets my Phi Beta Kappa key a janglin’.”

My greatest thrill came when Denis invited me and some of my friends to a private screening at MGM studios. I had never seen myself on the big screen before and I thought he had done a magnificent job on the documentary. He showed us an Elvis we had never seen before. And after previewing the movie for us, he showed us some outtakes, one which I will never forget: Elvis bending over to kiss the women in the front row, as he was singing “Love Me Tender.” The best shot of all was when Elvis kissed me. That shot did not make it into the movie, but the kiss and seeing it on the big screen is etched in my memory forever!

Good times . . .

 

Ann Moses reporting about “back in the day.”

TTWII Elvis Presley messing around during rehearsals at MGM Studios in Culver City, Ca.
Ann Moses editor Tiger Beat magazine July, 1969
Ann Moses editor Tiger Beat magazine Jul

ELVIS SUMMER FESTIVAL: 

At the end of last year, THE ELVIS FILES TEAM were very proud when we released the trilogy Box ELVIS SUMMER FESTIVAL - That's The Way It Was Volume 1-2 & 3 with nearly 2,000 unseen photos. The three books were very well received by Elvis fans all over the world.

THE ELVIS FILES are now even more proud to present the new box set.
 

 

ELVIS SUMMER FESTIVAL ─ That's The Way It Was ─ Volume 4&5

 


 

The set consists of two Hardcover books, about 800 pages, packed in a slipcase with more than 1100 color and black/white photos you never have seen before in this pristine quality!


 

NO ONE ELSE HAS OR WILL GET THESE PHOTOS ─ ONLY IN THESE TWO VOLUMES

Erik Lorentzen's new publication Vol.4&5 TTWII Summer Festival 1970
Erik Lorentzen's new publication Vol.4&5 TTWII Summer Festival 1970
Erik Lorentzen's new publication Vol.4&5 TTWII Summer Festival 1970

─ Latest Releases ─

TTWII Summer Festival soft cover table book
The Elvis Files magazine issue 32
The Elvis files double feature book: Behind the scenes of Speedway / Stay Away, Joe

New York Herald Tribune critic John Crosby described Presley as 'this unspeakably untalented and vulgar young entertainer,' but saw a silver lining:

'One thing about Elvis Presley, the convulsive shouter of rock 'n' roll songs — if that's what they are: This may be the end of rock 'n' roll and just conceivably a return to musical sanity. I mean, where do you go from Elvis Presley . . . short of open obscenity which is against the law?' The fans have been striking back. One woman critic got scores of calls from girls, informing her that she was "an old stinkin' rat,' 'a so-an-so old bag,' etc., etc.

Published quotes of Presley fans indicate that any adult who denounces their idol is dicing with disaster, typically;

Raving

'When Elvis was here,' raved Carla Jo Stewart, 16 of Amarillo, Texas, 'the doors didn't open until 6 o'clock, and the teenagers were there at 4 o'clock. I was up at the very front, but got pushed away because of the more than anxious crowd. A big glass door was pushed out and I got a big gash in my leg, but who cares if it left a scar? I got it trying to see Elvis, and I'm proud of it. I guess memories are made of this'!

 

LIFE magazine published teenagers' reactions to its story on Elvis, in which it described him as 'a howling hillbilly':

'Sirs,— I know from experience that it's impossible to sit still while Elvis is on stage. His belting style drives us wild. We have to do something. Kick the seat in front, or let out a 'rebel yell,' or something.

(Signed) Janie. Butterfield, Beaumont, Texas.'

Embarrassing Attempts to present Presley to a more sophisticated audience have usually failed. His first nightclub engagement was a two-week stand at the New Frontier Hotel, Las Vegas. 'Elvis,' it was reported, was somewhat like a jug of corn liquor at a champagne party. He hollered songs like 'Blue Suede Shoes' and 'Heartbreak Hotel' and his bodily motions were embarrassingly specific. 'Most of the slick, moneyed audience sighed with relief when it was over, having sat through Presley as if he were a clinical experiment. Elvis' comment:

"I don't want no more nightclubs." '"An audience like this don't show their appreciation the same way. They're eatin' when I come on."

Presley plays innocent when asked to explain his appeal. 'Ma'am,' he told a woman reporter, 'I'm not tryin' to be sexy. I didn't have no idea of tryin' to sell sex. It's just my way of expressin' how I feel when I move around. 'My movements, ma'am, are all leg movements . . . I don't do nothin' with my body . . . I don't do any vulgar movements. I just do a lot of wigglin' and quiverin' but I never do a bump or grind. I can't stand still when I sing, so the kids can't sit still.'

Municipal Auditorium in Amarillo, Texas. April 13, 1956.
Municipal Auditorium in Amarillo, Texas. April 13. 1956.

  Blast from the Past

still available through our shop

Elvis - The King of Hawaii (2011)
Very impressive book. You can see pictures of all the movies Elvis made in Hawaii. Hundreds of them. Not only The Aloha Special, but also all the other great moments from Elvis in Hawaii.

The movies, Elvis on holiday in may 1968 and 1969, and also march 1977. In concert in November 1972 as a rehearsal for the Aloha, and countless pictures of the Aloha Special ─ January 14, 1973.

From Erik Lorentzen, 384 pages.
The Elvis Files book Vol.4 (2010)
The Elvis Files Vol. 4 1965–1968 features over 1300 stunning photos in its 570 pages and all in quality printing.

All ELVIS EVENTS in 1965-1968 are featured: Every working moment, Elvis movies from 'Harum Scarum' to 'Speedway' to 'The Trouble With Girls,' 100 pages of rare Elvis candids.

All the Recording Sessions, Elvis and Priscilla's wedding, Birth of Lisa Marie, The Comeback Special
King Creole - Frame by Frame (2012) with Pål Granlund and Erik Lorentzen
King Creole: Frame By Frame

400-page hardcover book by FTD, Erik Lorentzen and Pål Granlund.

This is the first volume of an exciting new series called Elvis Presley In Hollywood. Volume two in this series, Jailhouse Rock: Frame By Frame

Each book will contain more than 400 pages and, alongside text written by Mike Eder, many hundreds of stunning, previously unpublished photographs that have been carefully selected.
Jailhouse Rock - Frame by Frame (2012) with Pål Granlund and Erik Lorentzen
Jailhouse Rock: Frame By Frame

400-page hardcover book by FTD, Erik Lorentzen and Pål Granlund.

This is the second volume of an exciting new series called Elvis Presley In Hollywood. Volume one in this series, King Creole: Frame By Frame

Each book will contain more than 400 pages and, alongside text written by Mike Eder, many hundreds of stunning, previously unpublished photographs that have been carefully selected
The Elvis Files book Vol.5 1969-1970 (2012)
The Elvis Files book Vol.5 1969-1970 (2012)

While the 1968 TV Special was an amazing comeback, Elvis’ return to the very top of his profession would never have happened without the Memphis 1969 recording sessions along with the live performances that followed. Let’s face it, Elvis’ amazing legacy was only sealed in gold by these two all-important years.

The Elvis Files Vol. 5 contains over 1,500 stunning photos in its 580 pages all from the fabulous return-to-splendour years of 1969 -1970.
The Elvis Files book Vol.1 1953-1956 (2013)
The Elvis Files Vol.1 1953 - 1956.

The first volume of the Elvis Files story, chronicling Elvis' rise from his pre-SUN discovery to becoming the world's biggest new sensation - nearly 600 pages & over 1,400 photos.

Every Working Moment.

The Early Tours, The first Las Vegas trip, Plenty of CANDID Moments. All the Recording Sessions, Elvis Interviews, The TV Shows, Love Me Tender.
The Elvis Files book Vol.6 (2013)
The Elvis Files Volume 6: 1971-1973

As with the other volumes release so far this again is a huge hardback book with 470 pages and feature more than 1500 photos.

Every single concert & tour, the Vegas and Tahoe shows, private moments and in studio, fan memories and more.
The King Of The Jungle (2014)
In June 1968 Elvis Presley taped a television special to be broadcast that Christmas. The TV special "Singer Presents Elvis" was a milestone in sixties music and a key to Elvis' musical renaissance.

A moment of change, when what was lost is found again. Elvis was lean and chiseled and ─ what he had not seemed in years ─ a little dangerous.

Featuring 546 pages the book includes a detailed look at everything that took place at the historic taping and recording sessions.
Ultimate Elvis Recording Sessions Vol.1 (2014)
Its initial impression is one of enormity in appearance and content. The three books in an accompanying slipcase weigh over 23 pounds, with each volume coming in at 7½ pounds. Each book is a large 9¾ by 11¾ inches in size, and collectively the set runs a whopping 1,712 pages.

Several hundred of those pages are filled with full-page photos of Elvis.

The publisher claims there are “approximately" 1,500 photos of all sizes in the books.

Erik Lorentzen, Piers Beagley, Keith Flynn,Gordon Minto.
Ultimate Elvis Recording Sessions Vol.2 (2014)
Its initial impression is one of enormity in appearance and content. The three books in an accompanying slipcase weigh over 23 pounds, with each volume coming in at 7½ pounds. Each book is a large 9¾ by 11¾ inches in size, and collectively the set runs a whopping 1,712 pages.

Several hundred of those pages are filled with full-page photos of Elvis.

The publisher claims there are “approximately" 1,500 photos of all sizes in the books.

Erik Lorentzen, Piers Beagley, Keith Flynn,Gordon Minto.
Ultimate Elvis Recording Sessions Vol.3 (2014)
Its initial impression is one of enormity in appearance and content. The three books in an accompanying slipcase weigh over 23 pounds, with each volume coming in at 7½ pounds. Each book is a large 9¾ by 11¾ inches in size, and collectively the set runs a whopping 1,712 pages.

Several hundred of those pages are filled with full-page photos of Elvis.

The publisher claims there are “approximately" 1,500 photos of all sizes in the books.

Erik Lorentzen, Piers Beagley, Keith Flynn,Gordon Minto.
Greater Than Ever - Elvis Presley A Touch of Gold Lamé (2015)
A Touch of Gold Lamé a 450+ page Hardcover book by Erik Lorentzen is the same size and weight (3.5kg / 7.7 pounds) as the Elvis Files books and will cover all you could want to know about Elvis and his 1957 concerts featuring the famous Gold Lame Suit.
The Elvis Files book Vol.7 (2015)
The seventh volume of the Elvis Files story chronicles Elvis' years on tour through the USA, the Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe seasons.

All ELVIS EVENTS in this Time Frame 1974-1975 are shown.

Every Working Moment, The Mid-Seventies Tours, The Las Vegas and Lake Tahoe Seasons, Plenty of CANDID Moments and Previously Unpublished Photos.

The cover photo is by Keith Alverson.
The Elvis Files book Vol.8 (2016)
Elvis Files Vol.8 1976-1977 will cover the final years of Elvis' life, the continuous energy - draining treadmill of tours, the final recording sessions and the last CBS TV Special.

While Elvis was not a well man in the last twenty months of his life, collectors will surely find this detailed look into these last years not only an emotional ride but also a part of Elvis' history that cannot be ignored.

The cover shot is taken by photographer Keith Alverson.
Elvis Presley in Person - The Florida Tour, August '56 (2016)
Elvis Presley In Person – The Florida Tour August ’56 by Erik Lorentzen.

The second book in the ‘Gold Standard’ series from Erik will focus on Elvis’ famous Florida tour of August 1956.
This well-known tour began on August 3rd in Miami and Elvis went on to perform 25 concerts in seven different cities over a nine day period. More than 100,000 fans saw Elvis perform, which was unique at the time as no entertainer had previously achieved such an impressive record.
Elvis at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair and Dairy Show September 26, 1956 (2016)
Having finished the Elvis Files series, Erik Lorentzen is concentrating on his new "Gold Standard Series" where he will expand on certain pivotal moments in Elvis' life enabling Lorentzen to publish yet more newly discovered and previously unpublished photos.

EIN has seen the pile of unreleased Tupelo concert photos and they are astounding.
Elvis and Ann-Margret: Love in Las Vegas (2016)
A beautiful soft cover book with 150 pages (25 x 30 cm / 9.8" x 11.8") of PURE LOVE and the latest book from 'The Elvis Files' author, Erik Lorentzen.

The book is written in English and contains a lot of great photos of the beautiful couple. KJ Consulting are proud to publish this book about one of the biggest (Hollywood) romance of the sixties. Only 900 copies printed. Almost sold out. Order now.
The World of FTD Vol.1 (2017) with Keith Flynn and Piers Beagley
Elvis recordings specialist Keith Flynn has completed a tour-de-force about the FTD label, a 1200 pages, hardbound three book set, chronicling every release by FTD.

The book was authored and designed by Keith Flynn with input from a large number of other Elvis specialists including EIN's Piers Beagley, EM&HM's Trevor Cajiao, Geoffrey McDonnell, Gordon Minto and many others.

The book also features 100s of high-quality photos from the collection Erik Lorentzen.

Source: EIN
The World of FTD Vol.2 (2017) with Keith Flynn and Piers Beagley
Elvis recordings specialist Keith Flynn has completed a tour-de-force about the FTD label, a 1200 pages, hardbound three book set, chronicling every release by FTD.

The book was authored and designed by Keith Flynn with input from a large number of other Elvis specialists including EIN's Piers Beagley, EM&HM's Trevor Cajiao, Geoffrey McDonnell, Gordon Minto and many others.

The book also features 100s of high-quality photos from the collection Erik Lorentzen.

Source: EIN
The World of FTD Vol.3 (2017) with Keith Flynn and Piers Beagley
Elvis recordings specialist Keith Flynn has completed a tour-de-force about the FTD label, a 1200 pages, hardbound three book set, chronicling every release by FTD.

The book was authored and designed by Keith Flynn with input from a large number of other Elvis specialists including EIN's Piers Beagley, EM&HM's Trevor Cajiao, Geoffrey McDonnell, Gordon Minto and many others.

The book also features 100s of high-quality photos from the collection Erik Lorentzen.

Source: EIN
The EPE Catalog by Bob Pakes (2017)
Bob Pakes is an early Elvis enthusiast who runs the impressive website 'Elvis Echoes Of The Past'. His first venture into publishing is the incredible 'The EPE Catalog' along with (The Elvis Files) Erik Lorentzen.

Over 390 pages 'The EPE Catalog' presents an A-Z guide with over 1,450 images on every weird and wonderful product that was part of the immensely successful 1956 Elvis Presley merchandise train.

The book is an incredible compendium of why teenage America went crazy for Elvis Presley!
The Reno Brothers (2018)
From Erik Lorentzen is the new mega Hardcover book, 'The Reno Brothers' about Elvis’ first movie, 'Love Me Tender.' This beautiful hardback book will contain many rare and unpublished photos and will be the ultimate book on 'Love Me Tender' with all the stories and, as always, countless mindblowing pictures. This book will be published in The Gold Standard Series.

Weight 3 kg / 6.6 pounds.
Size W 25cm (9.84") x H 30cm (11.8") x D 3.5cm (1.4")
Las Vegas '56 (2018)
Elvis' First Las Vegas season hardcover book.
Elvis Presley made his Las Vegas debut on April 23, 1956. He performs in the Venus Room at the Frontier Hotel.

Elvis Presley is in the forefront of the Freddie Martin Orchestra and the comedian Shecky Greene. He is booked for two weeks.

Weight 3 kg / 6.6 pounds. Size W 25cm (9.84") x H 30cm (11.8")
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MANY ELVIS BOOKS

Lorentzen's books broaden your Elvis knowledge

New York Times

ELVIS PRESLEY DIES; ROCK SINGER WAS 42

Heart Failure Cited by Coroner ─ Acclaim Followed Scorn

By MOLLY IVINS

Elvis Presley, the first and greatest American rock-and-roll star, died yesterday at the age of 42. Mr. Presley, whose throaty baritone and blatant sexuality redefined popular music, was found unconscious in the bedroom of his home, called Graceland, in Memphis yesterday at 2:30 P.M. He was pronounced dead an hour later at Baptist Memorial Hospital, after doctors failed to revive him.

Dr. Jerry Francisco, the Shelby County coroner, who conducted a two-hour examination of the body, said "preliminary autopsy findings" indicated that the cause of death was "cardiac arrhythmia," which a hospital spokesman defined as "an irregular and ineffective heart beat." The coroner was not immediately able to determine the cause of the "cardiac arrhythmia." Mr. Presley was once the object of such adulation that teen-age girls screamed and fainted at the sight of him. He was also denounced for what was considered sexually suggestive conduct on stage. Preachers inveighed against him in sermons and parents forbade their children to watch him on television. In his first television appearance on the Ed Sullivan show, his act, which might be thought of as tame by today's standards, was considered by the broadcasters to be so scandalous that the cameras showed him only from the waist up, lest his wiggling hips show.

Mr. Presley's early hit songs are an indelible part of the memories of anyone who grew up in the 50's. "Hound Dog," "Heartbreak Hotel" and "Blue Suede Shoes" were teen-age anthems. Like Frank Sinatra in the decade before and the Beatles a decade later, Mr. Presley was more than a singer ─ he was a phenomenon, with 45 gold records that sold more than one million copies each.

Mr. Presley was a show-business legend before he was 25 years old. At the age of 30 he was the highest-paid performer in the history of the business. He made 28 films, virtually every one of them frivolous personality vehicles and nearly all of them second-rated at best, but they gross millions.

In recent years, Mr. Presley, who used to carry about 175 pounds on a 6-foot frame, had been plagued with overweight. A recently published book called "Elvis, What Happened?" by three of his former bodyguards alleged that the singer was given to using amphetamines.

History of Mild Hypertension

Dr. Francisco said yesterday that Mr. Presley had a history of mild hypertension and that he had found evidence of coronary artery disease. Both of these, the coroner said, could have been "contributing causes" in Mr. Presley's death." But the specific cause may not be known for a week or two pending lab studies," he said, adding, "It is possible in cases like this that the specific cause will never be known." A hospital spokesman said that the coroner is required by law to conduct an examination if the case of death is not immediately apparent. Responding to repeated questions about whether the autopsy had revealed any signs of drug abuse, the coroner said the only drugs he had detected were those that had been prescribed by Mr. Presley's personal physician for hypertension and a blockage of the colon, for which he had been hospitalized twice in 1975.

Dr. George Nichopoulos, Mr. Presley's personal physician told the Associated Press that Mr. Presley was last seen alive shortly after 9 A.M. Dr. Nichopoulos said that Mr. Presley had been taking a number of appetite depressants, but the physician said they had not contributed to his death.

Milwaukee Arena Milwaukee WI. April 27, 1977
August 16, 1956 LA Airport

Elvis Aron Presley was born in a two-room house in Tupelo, Miss., on Jan. 8, 1935. During his childhood, he appeared with his parents, Gladys and Vernon Presley, as a popular singing trio at camp meetings, revivals and church conventions. The family moved to Memphis when Mr. Presley was 13. He attended L.C. Humes High School and worked as an usher in a movie theater. After graduation, he got a job driving a truck for $35 a week. In 1953, Mr. Presley recorded his first song and paid $4 for the privilege; he took the one copy home and played it over and over. A shrewd song promotor called "Colonel" Thomas A. Parker was impressed by the early records and took over the management of Mr. Presley's career. Mr. Presley toured in rural areas under the sobriquet "The Hill-Billy Cat." Colonel Parker, a character of P.T. Barnum proportions, followed the credo, "Don't explain it, just sell it." He once observed, "I consider it my patriotic duty to keep Elvis up in the 90 percent tax bracket." When Colonel Parker went to negotiate with 20th Century-Fox on a film deal that would be Mr. Presley's screen debut, the studio executives dwelled on the singer's youth and inexperience. "Would $25,000 be all right?" one executive finally asked. Colonel Parker replied: "That's fine for me. Now, how about the boy?"

"Heartbreak Hotel," Mr. Presley's first song hit, was released by RCA in January 1956. A blood- stirring dirge about love and loneliness, it burned up the jukeboxes and eventually sold two million copies. A phenomenal string of hit songs followed, and Elvis Presley fan clubs sprouted all over the world; membership at one time numbered 400,000. In 1956, he went to Hollywood to make his first film, "Love Me Tender." It opened to unanimous jeers from the critics and grossed between five and six times what it cost to make. His later films were conducted equally obnoxious by cineastes.

 

One critic remarked of "Jailhouse Rock" that Mr. Presley had been "sensitively cast as a slob." Mr. Presley responded, "That's the way the mop flops."

Jailhouse Rock scene still 1957

KJ Consulting

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0382 Oslo, Norway

erik@theelvisfiles.com

© 2020 Robert van Beek

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The World of FTD Vol.2 (2017) with Keith Flynn and Piers Beagley

Elvis recordings specialist Keith Flynn has completed a tour-de-force about the FTD label, a 1200 pages, hardbound three book set, chronicling every release by FTD. The book was authored and designed by Keith Flynn with input from a large number of other Elvis specialists including EIN's Piers Beagley, EM&HM's Trevor Cajiao, Geoffrey McDonnell, Gordon Minto and many others. The book also features 100s of high-quality photos from the collection Erik Lorentzen. Source: EIN

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